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University of Northern Colorado Summer Art Season Returns

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The University of Northern Colorado will restart its summer arts season this month with productions from the Little Theater of the Rockies and free outdoor musical performances in the Concerts Under the Stars series. The Little Theater of the Rockies, the oldest professional summer stock theater west of the Mississippi River and the oldest professional theater company in Colorado according to UNC, has three different shows scheduled in June and July. The company is in the midst of staging the murder mystery “Clue” June 16-19 at the Langworthy Theater in Frasier Hall. Shows are at 7:30 pm from June 16 to 18 and at 2 pm. 19th of June. The theater will present the comedy “The Revolutionists” July 7-10 and 14-17 at the Norton Theater in Gray Hall. Show times are 7:30 pm July 7-9 and 14-16, and 2 pm July 10 and 17. Inspired by and featuring Elvis Presley songs, the musical “All Shook Up” will run July 28-31 at Langworthy. Theater. Show times are at 7:30 p.m. July 28-30 and 2 pm on July 31. About a dozen UNC alumni return to campus to take on directing, lighting and sound design roles in LTR productions. Many performed at LTR growing up, including Megan Van De Hey, who is this year’s artistic director. Van De Hey says that LTR prepared her for the world of professional theater by building her physical and mental toughness. “LTR has been a mainstay in my life for almost 30 years,” Van De Hey said in a statement from the university. “I have grown as an artist and as a person thanks to my time with LTR. I feel very fortunate that the university and the community value this program because what it provides to students is invaluable.” A 2021 Little Theater of the Rockies production. The University of Northern Colorado company is the oldest professional summer theater west of the Mississippi and the oldest professional theater company in Colorado. Under new artistic leadership, the Little Theater of the Rockies will present three productions through the summer of 2022, “Clue,” “The Revolutionists,” and “All Shook Up.” (Photo courtesy: University of Northern Colorado). Concerts Under the Stars features a diverse lineup of musicians every Tuesday in July at UNC’s Garden Theater on 10th Avenue. The concerts start at 8 pm and are free and open to the public. Attendees may bring a blanket, lawn chair, and picnic food. The concert schedule: July 5, the Denver Brass; July 12, the Colorado Jazz Orchestra; July 19, The Burroughs; and July 26, Salsa Forte. “This year’s lineup promises a mix of sounds including swing, funk, Latin music and an American flavor right after the Fourth of July holiday, when singer Stephen Taylor joins the Denver Brass,” said Melissa Malde, associate dean. of the Faculty of Interpretation and Interpretation of the UNC. Visual arts. “We couldn’t have done this without the generosity of our community partners.” While the UNC College of Performing and Visual Arts organizes and helps sponsor these events, generous donors also make the performances possible. UCHealth is the primary sponsor of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, and the Bohemian Foundation’s Littler Youth Fund grant provided funding to ensure Weld County youth can attend LTR at no cost. Weld Community Foundation supports both Concerts Under the Stars and LTR. “For years, Concerts Under the Stars at the Garden Theater have been an iconic summer tradition. His absence left a noticeable void,” said Rand Morgan, president and CEO of the Weld Community Foundation. “The Weld Community Foundation’s mission is about our middle name, ‘community.’ We knew our 25th anniversary was coming up this year, and what better way to celebrate than to help bring Concerts Under the Stars back? About a dozen UNC alumni are returning to campus, taking on directing, lighting and sound design roles in LTR productions. And they are no strangers to the stage. Many performed at LTR growing up, including Megan Van De Hey, who is this year’s artistic director. Van De Hey says that LTR prepared her for the world of professional theater by building her physical and mental toughness. “LTR has been a mainstay in my life for almost 30 years,” said Van De Hey. “I have grown as an artist and as a person thanks to my time with LTR. I feel very fortunate that the university and the community value this program because what it provides to students is invaluable.”

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Meow Wolf’s Vortex Music Festival at a Sun Valley Junkyard This August

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Meow Wolf will hold its Vortex music festival on what is now an industrial lot in Denver’s Sun Valley neighborhood, putting an end to speculation about where the signature public event would take place when it first arrives in town this year. It will be the first event to be held at The Junk Yard, which is a new downtown open-air venue run by music promoter Live Nation. The site, at 2323 Mulberry Place, is about a mile south of Meow Wolf’s permanent immersive installation, Convergence Station, in an industrial neighborhood just east of I-25. The event, from Aug. 5-7, will include three days of music for all ages, food trucks and other entertainment, Live Nation said in a statement last week. The Denver-based mega-developer described the property’s owners as “family friends from Live Nation.” Publicists for Meow Wolf and Live Nation did not immediately respond to questions about the capacity of the venue, or who the “family friends of Live Nation” are. “The new owners of The Junk Yard saw a tremendous opportunity to transform a junkyard into a multi-faceted music festival in the heart of the city,” the statement read. “The new venue will undergo a dramatic metamorphosis into another world for Vortex 2022, a transition that is common for many Meow Wolf events and activations, with two impressive stages (Viscera Stage and Atria Stage), art installations… and comfortable rest areas. .” Since the location is in a tangle of off-grid cul-de-sacs, Meow Wolf has included suggested routes on their experience planning page. That includes the closest bus stop (West 8th Avenue and Wyandot Street); the Light Trail station at 10th and Osage streets; and other RTD and bike share options. (Or, it’s a 45-minute walk to the center of town.) There is extremely limited parking in the area, authorities said. Meow Wolf announced in April that the festival would be coming to Denver for the first time this year, having previously been based in Taos, NM, but had not disclosed the location. Meow Wolf opened its convergence station in Denver in September 2021. Previously announced acts include Toro y Moi, 100 gecs, Bob Moses, Neil Frances, Duke Dumont and Maya Jane Coles. Local musicians scheduled to perform include Neon the Bishop, Mr. Frick, Send/Receive and Peer Review. A one-day general admission ticket for the festival is $69.50 per day, while three-day general admission is $198.75, via ticketmaster.com. Tickets are now on sale. Meow Wolf Denver last year opened its Convergence Station facility to praise and buzz, having first cornered the market on “immersive experiences” years ago from its Santa Fe home base. Meow Wolf said it ticked the customer location number one million on June 15. Sign up for our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Coloradans May Be Asked To Legalize Psilocybin In The November 2022 Election

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Imagine if Coloradans suffering from anxiety or PTSD had a legal way to treat their ailments with psychedelic mushrooms. Advocates say it’s not that far away. Residents could vote in November to legalize psilocybin and psilocin, the psychoactive compounds in magic mushrooms, for use in therapeutic settings after advocates said they had collected enough signatures to qualify the ballot question. On Monday, Kevin Matthews and Veronica Perez of Natural Medicine Colorado, the campaign behind the legalization effort, submitted a petition with 222,648 signatures supporting Initiative 58, also known as the Natural Medicine Health Act, to the Secretary of State’s office. The state still needs to verify signatures, so it’s not a done deal yet, but since it requires about 125,000 valid signatures, Natural Medicine Colorado thinks the question will be in front of voters this fall. If passed, the Natural Medicine Health Act would lay the groundwork for a legal mushroom market by tasking Colorado regulators with creating rules on growing, manufacturing, testing, transporting, selling and buying of psilocybin and psilocin. While the measure restricts sales to designated “healing centers” that are licensed by the state, so you wouldn’t be allowed to walk into a store or dispensary and buy “mushrooms without a prescription,” it also expands decriminalization for possession, use and gifts throughout the state. Because it establishes a new framework for treatment centers, regulators would also define the necessary qualification, education and training requirements for facilitators who administer the substances. Kevin Matthews led the effort to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms in Denver in 2019. He is now considering legalization statewide. On June 27, Natural Medicine Colorado submitted a petition with 222,648 signatures in support of Initiative 58, also known as the Natural Medicine Health Act, to the Secretary of State’s office. The measure asks voters to legalize psilocybin and psilocin, the psychoactive compounds in magic mushrooms, for use in therapeutic settings. “The most important thing that I hope people understand is that these natural medicines have been used by humans for 10,000 years and in the last 20 to 25 years there has been a significant amount of clinical research at universities like Johns Hopkins and UCLA that really show the effectiveness. of natural medicines,” Matthews, who led Denver’s decriminalization initiative in 2019, said by phone. “Coloradons truly deserve to have access to these amazing healing options because we are facing a mental health crisis in the state right now.” With regard to decriminalization, the measure means that locals would not be arrested for possessing, using or growing a “personal amount” of psilocybin or psilocin, or giving mushrooms to adults over the age of 21. (The term personal quantity is not defined, and as a local rabbi recently discovered, growing more than 30 strains of psychedelic mushrooms can still result in criminal charges.) That ensures more Coloradans have access to these emerging drugs, Pérez said. RELATED: Mushroom Rabbi Grows Ceremonial Psilocybin For Denver Congregation, But Is That Legal? “There are many people in Colorado who have been harmed by the health care system and they will not be the ones who can access through the healing centers. They want to sit with a wisdom keeper or nanny in their home. So we also have a regulated model for those who want the railings,” he said. “That’s what makes the move so beautiful: We meet the most people where they are.” The measure calls for regulations to be put in place and for the state to begin accepting license applications by September 30, 2024, and also establishes a Natural Medicine Advisory Board to consult with lawmakers throughout the process. If adopted, Colorado would be the second state to legalize mushrooms after Oregon. On June 27, Natural Medicine Colorado submitted a petition with 222,648 signatures in support of Initiative 58, also known as the Natural Medicine Health Act, to the Secretary of State’s office. Initiative 58 builds on recent enthusiasm for psilocybin, which has shown promising results in treating depression, PTSD, anxiety among the terminally ill, and even nicotine addiction in college studies. And he’s not alone: ​​Decriminalize Nature Colorado advocates have been campaigning in support of a competing ballot measure, Initiative 61, which aims to decriminalize entheogenic plants and mushrooms, including psilocybin, dimethyltryptamine (DMT), and ibogaine, without establishing a legal market. . Nicole Foerster, campaign leader in competition, was not immediately available for comment, but she expressed concern about who would be left behind by a regulated market earlier this year when they introduced the proposed initiative. It is unclear how many signatures Initiative 61 has collected so far. “Without decriminalization and security that allows affected communities to organize more effectively, regulatory models will make it difficult for the most disadvantaged groups of our population to continue to access the natural medicines that they safely use to heal themselves,” Foerster said in a statement. January release. . “To address this, we are advocating for a simple change to existing laws on these controlled substances.” The original draft of Initiative 58 included the legalization of other psychedelics, such as mescaline, DMT, and ibogaine; however, the current measure only covers mushrooms, at least until June 1, 2026. Thereafter, the aforementioned substances could be added to the regulated system. Matthews and Perez said their goal is to start gradually and not overwhelm regulators with additional substances that require different approaches. “This is new to Colorado. I think two years for (the Department of Regulatory Agencies) and the advisory board to develop something for psilocybin is an excellent time frame,” Pérez said. “Loading DORA with five different substances with different applications, that’s a lot. Let’s start with one, make sure you have a good solid foundation.” Sign up for our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Governor Polis Takes Action to Address Lifeguard Shortage at Colorado Public Pools

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Gov. Jared Polis is jumping into the water in an effort to help rescue some of Colorado’s public pools that have been unable to open or have had to reduce hours due to a significant lifeguard shortage. Pools in Denver, Aurora, Thornton and Boulder have struggled to find enough employees this summer, part of a nationwide lifeguard problem. Aurora Governor and Mayor Mike Coffman appeared Tuesday at the Aurora Central Recreation Center to lay out Polis’ three-pronged approach. First, he is enacting an emergency measure that will allow 16- and 17-year-old staff members to work overtime if they choose. Those lifeguards could earn up to $24 an hour. He also announced a $25,000 grant program that area aquatic centers can apply for starting July 1 to potentially use to pay their staff more or put toward recruiting efforts. “This additional funding from the state of Colorado … will allow us to hire the talent, train the talent necessary to keep all of our pools open this summer,” Coffman said. The final piece is a program that will allow aspiring lifeguards to be paid $1,000 for a week of lifeguard training. Several of the state’s public pools have delayed the start of swimming season and/or operated on limited hours this summer after facing staffing shortages, particularly a lack of lifeguards and supervisors. A statewide survey, Polis said, found that only 57 percent of Colorado pools are fully open. “Opening our pools is really a watershed moment for our state, and trust me, it’s not a cakewalk: we’re getting it done,” Polis said. In Aurora, all six of the city’s outdoor pools opened on May 28, but only on a limited basis due to lifeguard shortage issues. Aurora lifeguards Kenzie Mayotte, 18, and Briseis Medina, 16, said that when they needed to cover a shift, it was often hard to get someone. “It’s that you don’t have hours or you have too many,” Mayotte said, “and you can’t find coverage.” Medina said that she could take advantage of the extra hours now that she is on summer vacation and the two agreed that they believe the governor’s announcement will definitely encourage more lifeguards to work longer hours. “I’m pretty sure it will help our staff to really hit the ground running knowing it’s time and a half and making more money for the summer,” Mayotte said. Ella sign up for our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news delivered straight to your inbox.

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