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10 books by Colorado authors published in 2022 that you should read

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Vauhini Vara began writing his first novel, “The Immortal King Rao,” in 2009, sold it to a publisher just before the pandemic hit in March 2020, and will see it published in hardcover by WW Norton & Company on March 3. may. Immortal King Rao” by Vauhini Vara. (WW Norton & Company) “The timing is crazy,” Vara said by phone from his home in Fort Collins this week. “I’ve been working on this for 13 years, and since then I’ve had a bunch of friends check out books, and I’ve gone to their readings in Denver, San Francisco, and New York. It’s a celebration and a party and it feels like a community occasion… but that’s not the case now (in the post), and hasn’t been for the past two years.” “Rao’s” Historical-Dystopian Fiction from the Indian village from which her father emigrated to the US, the genre-bending story has already garnered endorsements from Vulture, The Guardian, and LitHub.“Rao” is just one of dozens of titles from Vara. Colorado authors hitting shelves and online bookstores this year Like the rest, it has a strong promotional upswing as authors fill online forums and stream their reads to promote new work. of bookstores with long lines feels distant. The good news is that publishers saw print book sales soar last year, with an 8.9% increase in 2021 over 2020, an increase of about 67 million of books, according to Publishers Weekly, with ta pa hard to the head. (In 2020, sales were up 8.2% from 2019, when some 694 million books were sold.) The Colorado authors have had mixed results. Reliable bestsellers and a handful of debut writers (fiction and nonfiction) have been commercially unleashed, but dozens of other essential works, reported by experts, have received little more than critical acclaim. Author talks and classes from nonprofits like the Lighthouse Writers Workshop have gone mostly virtual, with no end in sight. Kali Fajardo-Anstine’s “Woman of Light” (Penguin Random House) current Lighthouse Mentor. (Full disclosure: Vara was an intern at The Denver Post in 2002.) “In the past, book tours were planned five or six months in advance,” she said. “Now the authors say they haven’t heard from their publishers. They want to do the right thing for authors and sell books, so it’s not a matter of less investment on their part.” Kali Fajardo-Anstine, arguably Colorado’s most celebrated literary voice of this young decade, published her collection of short stories, “Sabrina & Corina,” in 2019. She is grateful to have established herself in the literary world before the pandemic wiped out the most stories in person. events. The book, which tells stories of Latinas and Native Americans living in the West, won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Awards. It received rave reviews from American and international critics, and Penguin Random House’s One World imprint published a paperback version. That latest achievement was on April 7, 2020, about a month after the pandemic hit. “It was the first time I received money from speaking engagements for being a writer,” she said. “I had never really made any money at this, and I was making the most I’ve ever made. When everyone lost everything, that started me on this journey as this virtual person and internet teacher.” Now, Fajardo-Anstine has a debut novel, the epic and deeply researched “Woman of Light,” which opens June 7. Influential literary voice Roxane Gay just picked it up for her book club, and the pre-release talk (not just promotional kind) casts it as even better than “Sabrina & Corina” (if not exactly apples to apples). “It follows the vast adventures of this family from the 1860s to the 1930s, so it’s very escapist in a way and that might resonate with people right now,” Fajardo-Anstine said. “But how will I promote it? I wrote an article for Harper’s Bazaar about what it was like to promote ‘Sabrina & Cornina’ on Instagram Live from the bedroom I grew up in at my parents’ house. … It will be (promoted) in many more online spaces than bookstores this time, but there is also a strong community of Chicanos and indigenous people across the Southwest that I have connected with during the pandemic.” Here are some new books to read from Colorado authors in 2022. (Thanks to Denver Post regional reviewer Sandra Dallas for contributing some of these mentions.) “Rise: My Story”, Lindsey Vonn The tale of how this Colorado- The World Cup-winning ski icon made it, filled with his rigorous training schedule, his injuries and her love of alpine skiing. Nothing about Tiger Woods? Still magnetic. (Available Now) — Sandra Dallas and John Wenzel “Hidden Mercy”, Michael J. O’Loughlin “Hidden Mercy” by Michael J. O’Loughin. (Broadleaf Books) The existential crises of the Catholic Church, particularly its handling of abuse scandals, have overshadowed the work of progressives like William Hart “Father Bill” McNichols, a Denver political scion turned priest who administered to patients dying with AIDS in the 1980s and 90s, against the wishes of the church. Since then, the openly gay priest has become known for his art (paintings of social justice figures as icons, rather than just religious ones). Author O’Loughlin isn’t strictly a Colorado name, but “Hidden Mercy: AIDS, Catholics and the Untold Story of Compassion in the Face of Fear” focuses on the still-radical empathy and action of McNichols, among others. (Out Now) “Attaboy,” Sam Tallent, co-founder of Denver stand-up company and Fine Gentleman’s Club, Sam Tallent, has had a surprisingly good pandemic, with strong sales and praise from comics like Marc Maron for his independent publishing “Running the Light”. (Maron, Doug Stanhope and others narrated the audio version.) Now, after the barely fictional story of “Running”, comes the Audible original “Attaboy”. The dark and bold fiction veers away from Tallent’s favorite subject matter for a story of boxing and addiction. It is narrated by Dan Bitner and Helen Laser. (Available Now) “Jane and the Year Without a Summer”, Stephanie Barron “Jane and the Year Without a Summer”, Stephanie Barron (Soho Press/Soho Crime) There can never be too much Jane Austen-influenced literature, if it’s done right. Barron, aka Francine Mathews, has shown this with her series Being a Jane Austen Mystery and “The Year Without a Summer” (her 14th book of hers) using real-life Austen as a starting point. It’s absolutely charming and one of her best among her prolific list of Jane Austen mysteries. (February 8) — Sandra Dallas and John Wenzel “Being Mary Bennet,” JC Peterson Harper Teen has bought and will publish Jenny “JC” Peterson’s first junior novel, a new reimagining of a “Pride and Prejudice” character (a feat in herself these days) and a debut that establishes Peterson as a witty and deeply empathetic voice on the national youth scene. (March 15) “The Vortex,” Scott Carney and Jason Miklian Investigative journalist, New York Times bestselling author, and Colorado anthropologist Carney has traveled the world exploring extreme endurance and the mind-body connection. A strength of Carney’s craft, but still a gear change from previous nonfiction books, “The Vortex: A True Story of History’s Deadliest Storm, an Unspeakble War, and Liberation,” sets its sights on the November storm 1970 that killed 500,000 and led to the revolution. and genocide in Southeast Asia. with a doctorate and the conflict and crisis expert Jason Miklian, from the University of Oslo. (March 29) “Little Souls,” Sandra Dallas “Little Souls” by Sandra Dallas (Macmillan) Yes, this New York Times bestselling author’s name appears as a contributor to this article (she’s a book review by the Denver Post for a long time) but is also a Colorado literary mainstay, having reviewed nearly every Colorado book worth reading in recent years, and writing more than a few of them herself. “Little Souls” follows Dallas in turns, tearing apart and building “Westering Women” with a historical look at our last pandemic (over 100 years ago), offering plenty of insight into the equally rancorous present. (April 26) “A Walter Hill Film,” Walter Chaw, Denver-based film critic and occasional contributor to the New York Times and NPR, Walter Chaw recently debuted on Netflix as part of director David Fincher’s handpicked “Voir” series. (“Fight Club,” “The Social Network”), in a segment that deconstructed director Walter Hill’s influential buddy comedy “48 Hours.” That episode’s global reach should ensure a larger audience for Chaw’s astute “A Walter Hill Movie,” the first critical biography of the underrated director’s career (after Chaw’s acclaimed “Miracle Mile” epigraph). The 464-page, 2.2-pound book features an introduction by best-selling crime author and Colorado resident James Ellroy. (Tentatively scheduled for October 2022) Sign up for our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Meow Wolf’s Vortex Music Festival at a Sun Valley Junkyard This August

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Meow Wolf will hold its Vortex music festival on what is now an industrial lot in Denver’s Sun Valley neighborhood, putting an end to speculation about where the signature public event would take place when it first arrives in town this year. It will be the first event to be held at The Junk Yard, which is a new downtown open-air venue run by music promoter Live Nation. The site, at 2323 Mulberry Place, is about a mile south of Meow Wolf’s permanent immersive installation, Convergence Station, in an industrial neighborhood just east of I-25. The event, from Aug. 5-7, will include three days of music for all ages, food trucks and other entertainment, Live Nation said in a statement last week. The Denver-based mega-developer described the property’s owners as “family friends from Live Nation.” Publicists for Meow Wolf and Live Nation did not immediately respond to questions about the capacity of the venue, or who the “family friends of Live Nation” are. “The new owners of The Junk Yard saw a tremendous opportunity to transform a junkyard into a multi-faceted music festival in the heart of the city,” the statement read. “The new venue will undergo a dramatic metamorphosis into another world for Vortex 2022, a transition that is common for many Meow Wolf events and activations, with two impressive stages (Viscera Stage and Atria Stage), art installations… and comfortable rest areas. .” Since the location is in a tangle of off-grid cul-de-sacs, Meow Wolf has included suggested routes on their experience planning page. That includes the closest bus stop (West 8th Avenue and Wyandot Street); the Light Trail station at 10th and Osage streets; and other RTD and bike share options. (Or, it’s a 45-minute walk to the center of town.) There is extremely limited parking in the area, authorities said. Meow Wolf announced in April that the festival would be coming to Denver for the first time this year, having previously been based in Taos, NM, but had not disclosed the location. Meow Wolf opened its convergence station in Denver in September 2021. Previously announced acts include Toro y Moi, 100 gecs, Bob Moses, Neil Frances, Duke Dumont and Maya Jane Coles. Local musicians scheduled to perform include Neon the Bishop, Mr. Frick, Send/Receive and Peer Review. A one-day general admission ticket for the festival is $69.50 per day, while three-day general admission is $198.75, via ticketmaster.com. Tickets are now on sale. Meow Wolf Denver last year opened its Convergence Station facility to praise and buzz, having first cornered the market on “immersive experiences” years ago from its Santa Fe home base. Meow Wolf said it ticked the customer location number one million on June 15. Sign up for our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Coloradans May Be Asked To Legalize Psilocybin In The November 2022 Election

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Imagine if Coloradans suffering from anxiety or PTSD had a legal way to treat their ailments with psychedelic mushrooms. Advocates say it’s not that far away. Residents could vote in November to legalize psilocybin and psilocin, the psychoactive compounds in magic mushrooms, for use in therapeutic settings after advocates said they had collected enough signatures to qualify the ballot question. On Monday, Kevin Matthews and Veronica Perez of Natural Medicine Colorado, the campaign behind the legalization effort, submitted a petition with 222,648 signatures supporting Initiative 58, also known as the Natural Medicine Health Act, to the Secretary of State’s office. The state still needs to verify signatures, so it’s not a done deal yet, but since it requires about 125,000 valid signatures, Natural Medicine Colorado thinks the question will be in front of voters this fall. If passed, the Natural Medicine Health Act would lay the groundwork for a legal mushroom market by tasking Colorado regulators with creating rules on growing, manufacturing, testing, transporting, selling and buying of psilocybin and psilocin. While the measure restricts sales to designated “healing centers” that are licensed by the state, so you wouldn’t be allowed to walk into a store or dispensary and buy “mushrooms without a prescription,” it also expands decriminalization for possession, use and gifts throughout the state. Because it establishes a new framework for treatment centers, regulators would also define the necessary qualification, education and training requirements for facilitators who administer the substances. Kevin Matthews led the effort to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms in Denver in 2019. He is now considering legalization statewide. On June 27, Natural Medicine Colorado submitted a petition with 222,648 signatures in support of Initiative 58, also known as the Natural Medicine Health Act, to the Secretary of State’s office. The measure asks voters to legalize psilocybin and psilocin, the psychoactive compounds in magic mushrooms, for use in therapeutic settings. “The most important thing that I hope people understand is that these natural medicines have been used by humans for 10,000 years and in the last 20 to 25 years there has been a significant amount of clinical research at universities like Johns Hopkins and UCLA that really show the effectiveness. of natural medicines,” Matthews, who led Denver’s decriminalization initiative in 2019, said by phone. “Coloradons truly deserve to have access to these amazing healing options because we are facing a mental health crisis in the state right now.” With regard to decriminalization, the measure means that locals would not be arrested for possessing, using or growing a “personal amount” of psilocybin or psilocin, or giving mushrooms to adults over the age of 21. (The term personal quantity is not defined, and as a local rabbi recently discovered, growing more than 30 strains of psychedelic mushrooms can still result in criminal charges.) That ensures more Coloradans have access to these emerging drugs, Pérez said. RELATED: Mushroom Rabbi Grows Ceremonial Psilocybin For Denver Congregation, But Is That Legal? “There are many people in Colorado who have been harmed by the health care system and they will not be the ones who can access through the healing centers. They want to sit with a wisdom keeper or nanny in their home. So we also have a regulated model for those who want the railings,” he said. “That’s what makes the move so beautiful: We meet the most people where they are.” The measure calls for regulations to be put in place and for the state to begin accepting license applications by September 30, 2024, and also establishes a Natural Medicine Advisory Board to consult with lawmakers throughout the process. If adopted, Colorado would be the second state to legalize mushrooms after Oregon. On June 27, Natural Medicine Colorado submitted a petition with 222,648 signatures in support of Initiative 58, also known as the Natural Medicine Health Act, to the Secretary of State’s office. Initiative 58 builds on recent enthusiasm for psilocybin, which has shown promising results in treating depression, PTSD, anxiety among the terminally ill, and even nicotine addiction in college studies. And he’s not alone: ​​Decriminalize Nature Colorado advocates have been campaigning in support of a competing ballot measure, Initiative 61, which aims to decriminalize entheogenic plants and mushrooms, including psilocybin, dimethyltryptamine (DMT), and ibogaine, without establishing a legal market. . Nicole Foerster, campaign leader in competition, was not immediately available for comment, but she expressed concern about who would be left behind by a regulated market earlier this year when they introduced the proposed initiative. It is unclear how many signatures Initiative 61 has collected so far. “Without decriminalization and security that allows affected communities to organize more effectively, regulatory models will make it difficult for the most disadvantaged groups of our population to continue to access the natural medicines that they safely use to heal themselves,” Foerster said in a statement. January release. . “To address this, we are advocating for a simple change to existing laws on these controlled substances.” The original draft of Initiative 58 included the legalization of other psychedelics, such as mescaline, DMT, and ibogaine; however, the current measure only covers mushrooms, at least until June 1, 2026. Thereafter, the aforementioned substances could be added to the regulated system. Matthews and Perez said their goal is to start gradually and not overwhelm regulators with additional substances that require different approaches. “This is new to Colorado. I think two years for (the Department of Regulatory Agencies) and the advisory board to develop something for psilocybin is an excellent time frame,” Pérez said. “Loading DORA with five different substances with different applications, that’s a lot. Let’s start with one, make sure you have a good solid foundation.” Sign up for our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Governor Polis Takes Action to Address Lifeguard Shortage at Colorado Public Pools

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Gov. Jared Polis is jumping into the water in an effort to help rescue some of Colorado’s public pools that have been unable to open or have had to reduce hours due to a significant lifeguard shortage. Pools in Denver, Aurora, Thornton and Boulder have struggled to find enough employees this summer, part of a nationwide lifeguard problem. Aurora Governor and Mayor Mike Coffman appeared Tuesday at the Aurora Central Recreation Center to lay out Polis’ three-pronged approach. First, he is enacting an emergency measure that will allow 16- and 17-year-old staff members to work overtime if they choose. Those lifeguards could earn up to $24 an hour. He also announced a $25,000 grant program that area aquatic centers can apply for starting July 1 to potentially use to pay their staff more or put toward recruiting efforts. “This additional funding from the state of Colorado … will allow us to hire the talent, train the talent necessary to keep all of our pools open this summer,” Coffman said. The final piece is a program that will allow aspiring lifeguards to be paid $1,000 for a week of lifeguard training. Several of the state’s public pools have delayed the start of swimming season and/or operated on limited hours this summer after facing staffing shortages, particularly a lack of lifeguards and supervisors. A statewide survey, Polis said, found that only 57 percent of Colorado pools are fully open. “Opening our pools is really a watershed moment for our state, and trust me, it’s not a cakewalk: we’re getting it done,” Polis said. In Aurora, all six of the city’s outdoor pools opened on May 28, but only on a limited basis due to lifeguard shortage issues. Aurora lifeguards Kenzie Mayotte, 18, and Briseis Medina, 16, said that when they needed to cover a shift, it was often hard to get someone. “It’s that you don’t have hours or you have too many,” Mayotte said, “and you can’t find coverage.” Medina said that she could take advantage of the extra hours now that she is on summer vacation and the two agreed that they believe the governor’s announcement will definitely encourage more lifeguards to work longer hours. “I’m pretty sure it will help our staff to really hit the ground running knowing it’s time and a half and making more money for the summer,” Mayotte said. Ella sign up for our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news delivered straight to your inbox.

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